Matt Birk: Pro Bowl Has Been Devalued

Former NFL offensive lineman for the Ravens and Vikings and current NFL Director of Football Development Matt Birk joined Tiki Barber on Tiki And Tierney on CBS Sports Radio Wednesday.

One of the main topics of discussions was minority coaches in the NFL and adhering by The Rooney Rule.

“It’s adhered too, teams have to follow it and for the most part, they want to,” Birk said. “It’s obviously well-intentioned. I don’t think it’s worked to the extent that everyone hoped to. That’s some things we’re trying to address. We’ve had some symposiums and workshops for the next generation of head coaches and general managers. We’re always sensitive to make sure that we include as many as minorities as we can because we want them to succeed. Being a head coach or GM in the NFL is a tough, tough job. It’s a lot of work. You’re under the microscope. Sometimes only one, two, three years max to turn a team around. There’s been an effort to offer more research and mentoring to those guys who are going to be in that seat very soon. We’re figuring out ways to get minorities more opportunities for those jobs.”

Birk, a six-time Pro Bowler, was also asked by Tiki about the Pro Bowl, which has been somewhat devalued because so many guys don’t want to go anymore.

“Yeah, I think it has honestly Tiki,” said Birk. “I don’t know why. When I was going in the early 2000’s, everybody went. It started with the quarterbacks. I don’t think Peyton Manning ever missed a Pro Bowl he was elected to, and that set the tone. It seems like you can have two Pro Bowl games with all the guys being named to the Pro Bowl. I don’t know why that is. It’s something that we’re trying to figure out. It seems the level of effort really dropped off. It’s hard not to track. Physicality is such a huge part of the game and you’re talking about after the season. It’s almost impossible to do.”

Birk is involved with the After The Impact Fund, which is taking the most dire need cases of military veterans and former players that would otherwise end up in the suicide statistics. You can go to donate online at AfterTheImpactFund.org.

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