Tierney: A Bad Look For Ayesha And The Curry Name

Ayesha Curry didn’t hold back on Twitter following Golden State’s 115-111 Game 6 loss in the NBA Finals on Thursday, and she’s getting considerable backlash as a result.

Some of that backlash is unwarranted, but some of it, well, some of it isn’t.

“My wife, like Tiki’s, is fiercely protective of us,” Brandon Tierney said on CBS Sports Radio’s Tiki and Tierney. “If you are lucky enough to marry a good woman, she has your back. So on every level, I understand Ayesha’s investment emotionally in the series. She is invested in her man’s journey, we get it. But to me, the only (tweet) that bothers me is the one that pertains to race. I think this is a bad look for Ayesha. It’s a bad look for the Curry name. When you tweet (that), for me, that underscores one of the many, many problems pertaining to race relations in this country.”

After tweeting that the NBA is rigged, the wife of the unanimous MVP apologized but then accused police of racially profiling her father before the game, saying he “almost got arrested” when he was mistaken for a fake-credential con artist.

“I think she made a bad decision to take a personal situation with her family and inject it into a series of tweets around a game and then try to make it a bigger narrative – and it’s just not,” Barber said. “It’s a non-sequitur. It doesn’t fit. She’s clearly wrong. There is no opinion about that. She’s wrong. Of course she can say whatever she wants. Hell, my wife got death threats on Instagram last week. People can say whatever they want. People are idiots. She didn’t do anything threatening, but she did something stupid. People are stupid on social media, and they say dumb things when emotion gets the best of them.

“I’ve always thought this: When you make a decision, a statement, an action, with emotion or with haste, you are often going to regret it. I think Ayesha Curry regrets letting the emotion of a basketball game affect what she’s disseminating to the world – and as a result, her husband is getting backlash for it, and that’s not fair to Steph. That’s not fair to what happened in the game.”

Tierney, meanwhile, found the tweets “damaging” and “reckless.”

“Are you telling me that according to Ayesha Curry that when a security guard or cop is vigilant in checking NBA credentials that that person is now racially profiling?” Tierney asked. “That is absolute, utter nonsense. It is unfair and it is stupid. And the problem is, people latch on to that dopey narrative and they retweet it and they favorite it and you’ve got this simmering flame of hate that just engulfs the world. I got a problem with what she tweeted. She shouldn’t tweet that.

“To me, it’s offensive to people who really are racially profiled,” Tierney continued. “That’s my problem. To the young black man who is thrown down by a white cop and choked – that happens all the time. I’m not an idiot. Of course I’ve seen it. But when that happens, if I’m that young black man laying on the floor, and I see this tweet, I’m saying, ‘Who the hell is she kidding? From your million-dollar ivory tower? Racially profiling? Are you nuts? Are you insane?’ I think it minimizes the real issue.”

Barber agreed.

“There is a black struggle in this country. It is not fake, it’s not made up, it’s not the Black Lives Matter people causing trouble. It is a serious and real issue. Now when you equate that to your father – someone who I’m sure is doing okay – to being racially profiled because your credential maybe wasn’t turned the right way or you didn’t show it the right way and someone wanted to ask for it, (that’s wrong). Look, I don’t know how this situation went down, but that’s what I assume would happen.”

In other words, Ayesha Curry’s father wasn’t thrown to the ground, beaten or hand-cuffed.

“When you equate something that’s benign to something that’s dead-ass serious, that’s wrong,” Barber said. “And so, I would be shocked if she didn’t issue an apology. She created something that she didn’t need to and it was because of frustrations at a basketball game. We’re not talking about the hood. We’re not talking about a police station where a guy got the crap beat out of him. We’re talking about Quicken (Loans) Arena. It’s a basketball arena. We’re not talking about what racially profiling is (usually) associated with.”

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